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Business of Agriculture Magazine: Saba Industries

Business of Agriculture Magazine (India) interviews Saba Industries Group Founder and Chairman Malini Saba.

Ms. Malini Saba

Publication:           Business of Agriculture Magazine

 

Headline:                Saba Industries

 

Language:              English

 

Edition:                   National

 

Page No:                 20, 21 & 22nd

 

About the Publication:

A Magazine on Business and Management of Agriculture. From a business standpoint, an agri-magazine dedicated at innovations and technology; the ‘business of agriculture’ – inputs, produce and post-harvest – will form the core of the magazine.

The Business of Agriculture
magazine interacted with
Asia’s emerging philanthropist,
Ms Malini Saba, a self-made
businesswoman, who has
helped millions of underserved
women, farmers and children in
South and Southeast Asia, South
America, Africa and the US. In
this interview, she provided us
with the insights of her company
and she is planning to expand her
business in India.

By Mandeep Kaur *

Please tell us about your journey of becoming a $1.5 billion company.
Our journey started 26 years ago. We started as an investor, and then we entered into a commodity business. Initially, we started this business with iron ore only and then slowly, we expanded our business into other metals and agriculture. During this journey, we endured failures, but with a sheer determination, we pulled ourselves out of it.

How did you conceive the idea of starting this company?
I wanted to work for myself. I had the vision to make enough to be comfortable and not to be dependent on anyone for income. Also, I have a passion for agricultural commodities, such as rice, and natural resources because they are essential for human existence. Being an entrepreneur, both success and failure are on your lap, but it is a fact that there is no success without failure. It is because of the hurdles and failures you learn the basics to build a true business on a solid foundation.

20 • Business of Agriculture | January-February 2019 • Vol. V • Issue 1

Put some light on your agriculture business model?
Agriculture is a very important sector as far as the food is concerned. This sector is very much dependent on Mother Nature, but it is that era where we can master the skills and perform well. As per our model, we work with the farmers and the distributors. We strongly believe that it is very important
to empower the farmers we work with because they are the ones, who feed the world. We provide infrastructure and technology to the farmers to enable them to increase their production. The less time they spend on the field harvesting, the quicker they can sell their product; and therefore, they can reinvest their time and money in the next crop. This also helps to improve crop production as well as crop yield.

Saba Industry is exporting 5,00,000 tons of rice worldwide. 
Please tell us about other agriculture commodities that you are trading.
In addition to rice, we also operate in palm oil, cashew and wheat businesses.

We use the same model for all the products.

Saba Industries is going to invest $100 million in the rice sector of India and Thailand. Why have you chosen India for this and what do you think would be the major challenges in this sector?
Agriculture is the most important sector of the Indian economy because India has a huge and vast agriculture space. India is known as a breadbasket and it is the world’s largest producer of pulses, rice, wheat, spices and other agriculture products. We feel that investing in India’s agriculture sector would help to streamline the system. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. So, we are planning to install large dryers with good operational capacities. Also, our plan is to export rice by partnering with local farmers. Working with us would help farmers to have a quick turn-around from planting to harvest.

Agriculture
is the most
important
sector of the
Indian economy
because India
has a huge and
vast agriculture
space.

I think one of the major challenges would be to gain the trust of the farmers. Other than this, in countries like India, transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector.

Saba Industries, the global exporter of agricultural commodities, is planning to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. From which region of India, are you planning to start your first phase and what are your expansion plans?

We are planning to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh. After Uttar Pradesh, we are planning to replicate the same model in Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal and other states over the next 18 to 24 months.

 

Will you be partnering with the Indian farmers as you did in other south-east Asian countries? How will you support farmers?

Yes, the only way to do this business is to partner directly with the farmers. We have various methods for doing this and it will depend on the farmer’s needs in particular states. We are aware that we will be working with farmers with different cultural backgrounds, we respect the cultural norms in each area and we also understand that we need to work within those perimeters.
We are planning to support farmers in India with free farm equipment and fertilisers. We will work on a model where we will procure their rice and we will get it processed at local mills.

What made you create success stories in these countries?

We have had a huge success in Cambodia and Vietnam. We followed practices like, we started by studying the terrain as we use to do before we embarked on any new jurisdiction. In these countries, we interacted with the local farmers and allowed them to educate us to understand their needs. After understanding their requirements, we provided necessary help and infrastructure to the farmers, because of which, they had a higher yield, better crops, and shorter harvest times.

Business of Agriculture | January-February 2019 • Vol. V • Issue 1 • 21

What has been the impact of your business model on the lives of farmers?
We help farmers to have better livelihoods. As per our agriculture model, we are partnering with the local farmers, so they directly get money from us. Our model also helps to reduce their debts. We identify all the possible reasons/causes of the farmer’s debts. We either try to help them settle their debts or enable them to have a better yield to make them self-sufficient.
Saba group encourages women to find opportunity in everything.

What are you doing for gender equality in the workplace and what do you think needs to be done?
We try to hire as many women as possible. We also encourage women employees to take further studies to better themselves to be able to earn more. We provide basic infrastructure to help them such as; our offices have childcare facilities, where women can bring their children along with them to the workplace. This way they don’t feel stressed and they can work better.
I feel women should be paid equally to men. I also believe that hiring a woman employed in management can bring a different balanced perspective to the work environment.

What was the idea behind starting a Saba family foundation? Please tell us about its vision.
Saba Family Foundation (SFF) began soon after I made my first million. I strongly believe in giving back to society. Moreover, I also have a special corner for women and

As per our
agriculture
model, we are
partnering
with the local
farmers, so they
directly get
money from us.

children. I grew up in a time when women were not holding high positions in work and there were very few entrepreneurs. SFF fought for women’s legal rights and health rights. We believe that if you help a woman you help the community and the nation.

She will always find a way to feed her baby. We were aware that education is the key; therefore we wanted to work with the partners who could enable women by educating them. At present, we are working with partners to push mandates and policy on bullying. This goes across gender as well as children in workplaces, schools and inside homes.

What is the global sentiment for commodity business?
The commodity sector was a hit in the past years and I believe it will further rise in the coming years.

What is the growth percentage of Saba Industries?
Over the last three years, our growth rate has been 33 percent. Let’s hope we keep that up!

Please tell us about your future vision.
We are aiming to bring technology to the agriculture sector. I believe, in future, the technology will have a great impact on the ways the crops are being produced. It will also improve the efficiency and the yield potential. Technology will bring a new revolution in the agriculture sector, as we have already witnessed this in the past. The agriculture sector is emerging with the help of technology and it will continue to get better and more improved over the years to come.

22 • Business of Agriculture | January-February 2019 • Vol. V • Issue 1

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Malini Saba’s Sprawling Mansion Is A Vintage Beauty With Unparalleled Luxury

Malini Saba’s Sprawling Mansion Is A Vintage Beauty With Unparalleled Luxury
The 13,000 sq ft mansion was redesigned where three different architectural influences from Samodh Palace, French Palace, and the English manor from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice were compiled together.

They say some houses have a saga to tell but Malini Saba, founder of Saba Industries and Saba Family house has a tale that you would love to decode on your own. Nestled in nine acres of land in Monaco, this mansion is the perfect example of elegance and unparalleled luxury.

Build in the 1980s the moment Saba laid her eyes on this house, she knew that her search of three years has finally come to an end.

The opulence of the 1800 style along with the center courtyard instantly made it the perfect place for her. The 13,000 sq ft mansion was redesigned where three different architectural influences from Samodh Palace, French Palace, and the English manor from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice were compiled together.

As tricky as it may sound but amalgamating these three cultures turned surprisingly beautiful.

“Everyone was weary of my taste but it turned out to be everything I wanted,” says Saba, recalling the moment. An ardent philanthropist who has worked for various humanitarian causes, her house consists of six bedrooms, seven bathrooms, a study with winding staircase and wall to wall bookshelves.

Be it a pool house or a mini-golf course, everything has been made keeping the minutest details in mind.

The stunning chandelier hanging from the ceiling of the living and dining room, and the fine gold engravings on the wall are a perfect example of how to engage design exquisitely with surroundings. Every room in Saba’s house takes you to a different part of the world, bringing our wanderlust on the surface.

While you have a theme inspired by the French court donning one part of the house, the television room imports you to the land of Rajasthan with lower settings. Every bedroom is different, while one is all about Japan and cherry blossoms, another is all about Cambodian theme with colors from religious monument Angkor Wat.

Saba has a small mandir (prayer room) in the east side of the house.

“It is very important for me to always incorporate that aspect into the home. The vibe of the house has a lot to do with energy and Feng Shui,” she says.

While every corner has a charm of its own, Saba has a soft side for the library.

“It’s where I can play my favourite music and cuddle my little one while I read or talk. When my family cannot find me in the home they can always find me in the library,” she laughs.

4 Gadgets Every Entrepreneur Must Try

4 Gadgets Every Entrepreneur Must Try
Priyadarshini Patwa
ENTREPRENEUR STAFF
Features Editor, Entrepreneur India

You’re reading content from Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

Gadgets are what we strive on.  There is no one in the world who isn’t invested in the latest technology. CES 2019 just gave us a glimpse of what present and future of smart ecosystem will be all about. Like it or not, technology is here to conquer all our space, the more you try to stay away from it, the more it seeps into the gaps digging its root deeper into our lives. And honestly, at times gadgets do make the life of an Entrepreneur a lot easier.

The technologically advanced gadgets at times help us rescue from various situations. Entrepreneur India brings you a list of four gadgets that these entrepreneurs swear by. They not just are fun to use but even helps in processing your work faster. So get set go and check out these gadgets that are here to make your life a little better and easier.


Huawei Mate 20 Pro

Source: Huawei

Don’t we all love upgrading our phones? With so many options in the market, it is often difficult to make a pick. But making it easier for you is Rohit Sahni, Director, WK Life who swears by Huawei Mate 20 Pro phone. What makes this phone an apt buy from a work point of view is its processor and camera and hands down to its other features.

“I got The Huawei Mate 20 Pro phone 15 Days back from Hong Kong, It has actually become my favourite Gadget today. I can share my battery with my friend through Wireless charging i.e. I can charge my phone through this phone. It has got Dot projector in the front which is very useful for me because I can make a 3D model of any of my product. It has the feature of creating many user accounts and private spaces. This is a really cool phone that I got after so long and using really expensive phones,” says Rohit Sahni.

Powered by octa-core processor, this phone comes with 8GB of RAM. The highlight is its fastest charging in the world and comes with a 50 Watt charger. The phone packs 128GB of internal storage that can be expanded up to 256GB. As far as the cameras are concerned, the Huawei Mate 20 Pro packs a 40-megapixel (f/1.8) primary camera and a 20-megapixel (f/2.2) secondary camera on the rear and a 24-megapixel front shooter for selfies.

“They were more people for this phone then Apple phone in CES, you can imagine what magic this phone is doing all over the world,” he adds.


Hyundai Mobis

Source: Hyundai Mobis

Looking for something that somewhere displays future of vehicular touchscreens? Hyundai Mobis is the next big thing on the block.

“I liked the new self-driving. Hyundai Mobis they have come up with. I love it because you cannot take the wheel in the Mobis because there is no wheel to take — just a sleek, streamlined dashboard — which is one way the cars can reduce the number of road-rage incidents and extended middle fingers. Isn’t that cool?

The Car recognizes your facial expressions, so if you’re angry, happy or sad, it changes the ambience of the vehicle. I thought this was a great touch. Can you also believe that  It reads other drivers’ and passengers’ emotions as well, so if they are agitated or sleepy, the vehicle automatically detects it? These days with so much road rage on the roads this kind of car could stop a lot of accidents and deaths,” says Malini Saba, Founder, Saba Industries and Saba Family Foundations.


The iPad Pro

Source: Apple

The thing with Apple and its products are that it always makes it to the list.

“Being a young entrepreneur, venturing into an existing family business, it became very difficult to incorporate technology into a not-so-tech friendly environment. The iPad Pro is one device that has made life very simple. From scribbling daily reminders to framing new ideas, the iPad Pro with the Apple Pencil gives me the ability to have all the things I have ever noted into a form factor that is as slim as a personal diary. With its simple pickup and use features, it makes you feel like actually using pen and paper. For me the best technology is the one which aids your working with the least learning curve, the iPad Pro is just that,” recommends Yashraj Bhatia, Director, Tintech Led Lights


The Eve Light Strip

Source: Evehome

Who doesn’t like some smart living? The Eve Light Strip is something that might grab your attention for sure.

“I have always been interested in getting my hands on new and upcoming tech gadgets. One of the gadgets that caught my eye this year was The Eve Light Strip that was displayed at the International Consumer Electronics Show. The Eve Light Strip is a LED strip, which connects to the home Wi-Fi and hence can be controlled from various sources wirelessly, including most of the Apple gadgets like iPhone, Apple TV, Apple watch, etc. The thing that I like most about The Eve Light Strips is the full-spectrum of lighting it offers with thousands of different colours and tones. It perfectly sets the lighting to the mood and surroundings. It catches commands in a just a flash via Siri, which makes it super convenient and ideally hands-free. I would recommend this product to everyone for a sleek lighting finish and the ease by which it is accessible,” Sargam Dhawan, Director, DAFNI India.

MALAYSIA’S SABA TO INVEST $100 MLN IN INDIA AND THAILAND RICE SECTOR

MALAYSIA’S SABA TO INVEST $100 MLN IN INDIA AND THAILAND RICE SECTOR

11/22/2018 7:28:00 AM (GMT)

MALAYSIA’S SABA TO INVEST $100 MLN IN INDIA AND THAILAND RICE SECTOR

Malaysian rice and other commodities manufacturer Saba Industries announced that it plans to inject $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

The company plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala  Saba Industries plans to establish approximately 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

For the first 2 to 3 years, the company intends to target Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. It intends to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilizers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster. In the first place, Saba Industries is probing at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month.

See link here: https://www.investsize.com/en/malaysias-saba-to-invest-%24100-mln-in-india-and-thailand-rice-sector

Suryaa: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Suryaa: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

International | Written by : IANS| Updated: Wed, Nov 21, 2018, 11:12 PM 


Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

See link here: https://www.suryaa.com/59551-saba-industries-to-invest-100-mn-in-rice-sector-in-india-thailand.html

Daijiworld: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Daijiworld: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Wed, Nov 21 2018 08:14:27 PM


New Delhi, Nov 21 (IANS):
 Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

See link here: https://www.daijiworld.com/news/newsDisplay.aspx?newsID=539632

Outlook India: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Outlook India: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand
THE NEWS SCROLL21 NOVEMBER 2018  Last Updated at 7:12 PM | SOURCE: IANS

New Delhi, Nov 21 Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

mgu/shs/sed

See link here: https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/saba-industries-to-invest-100-mn-in-rice-sector-in-india-thailand/1425573

Sify Finance: Saba Industries to invest $ 100 million in rice sector in India, Thailand

Sify Finance: Saba Industries to invest $ 100 million in rice sector in India, Thailand

Source : Last Updated: Thu, Nov 22, 2018 11:20 hrs

A woman winnows rice in a field on the outskirts of Ahmedabad, India November 10, 2017. REUTERS/Amit Dave

New Delhi: Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said. The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold. “Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India.

One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

See link here: http://www.sify.com/finance/saba-industries-to-invest-100-million-in-rice-sector-in-india-thailand-news-agriculture-slvtqMeiiibhe.html

Maeeshat Business: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Maeeshat Business: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Posted by: Maeeshat.in in CommoditiesCommodities NewsCommodity MarketEconomyInvestingMarketsNews November 21, 2018 0

New Delhi : Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

—IANS

See link here: http://www.maeeshat.in/2018/11/saba-industries-to-invest-100-mn-in-rice-sector-in-india-thailand/

 

WebIndia123: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

WebIndia123: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand
New Delhi | Wednesday, 2018 7:45:04 PM IST
Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.”We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

–IANS mgu/shs/sed

( 350 Words)

2018-11-21-19:12:33 (IANS)

See link here: https://news.webindia123.com/news/Articles/Business/20181121/3477673.html

Yahoo News: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Yahoo News: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

 Indo Asian News Service


New Delhi, Nov 21 (IANS) Malaysia-based Saba Industries Chairman and CEO Malini Saba on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the rice sector in India and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between Thailand and India. And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” Saba told IANS during her visit to India.

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s rice sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes rice per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with farm equipment and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, Middle East and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

Farm equipment will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.

The founder of the $650-million company also deals in mining of iron ore and gold.

“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

–IANS

mgu/shs/sed

See link here: https://in.news.yahoo.com/saba-industries-invest-100-mn-rice-sector-india-134203073.html

Business Standard: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

Business Standard: Saba Industries to invest $100 mn in rice sector in India, Thailand

IANS  |  New Delhi Last Updated at November 21, 2018 19:15 IST


Malaysia-based Industries Malini on Wednesday said the privately-held company will invest $100 million in the sector in and Thailand, as it plans to export the staple by partnering with local farmers.

“We are looking at a $100 million investment between and  And based on how much more money we need to pump in, we will do that in the next phase. We plan to start our first phase in Uttar Pradesh,” told IANS during her visit to 

The global exporter of agricultural commodities plans to enter warehousing and drying space in India’s sector. The Kuala Lumpur-based firm will set up about 10 warehouses in Uttar Pradesh and as many dryers with an aim to dry 1,000 tonnes per day.

“In the initial 2-3 years, we plan to focus on Uttar Pradesh, partnering with the farmers there. As we did in other south-east Asian countries, we plan to support the farmers in India with and fertilisers for free and procure their rice and get it processed at local mills.

“To start with, we are looking at exporting 20,000 to 25,000 tonnes of rice, particularly Basmati, per month. We have a ready clientele in the US, and other parts of the world,” Saba said.

will help farmers plant and harvest paddy faster, she said.
The founder of the $650-million company also deals in of iron ore and gold.
“Transportation and warehousing are the major challenges in the agriculture sector in most countries like India. One of the things we discovered in India is that the drying capacity is quite limited despite the presence of a number of mills. We plan to get in large dryers with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 tonnes a month,” she said.

After Uttar Pradesh, the company will replicate the model in and and later to other states to scale up its operations in India.

–IANS
mgu/shs/sed
(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)
See link here: https://www.business-standard.com/article/news-ians/saba-industries-to-invest-100-mn-in-rice-sector-in-india-thailand-118112101076_1.html

First Published: Wed, November 21 2018. 19:12 IST

Success is being happy and content with your life

Success is being happy and content with your life

This original article appeared in this digital version of The Sunday Guardian Live paper here. See page #16 for specific article.

“Success is being happy and content with your life”

Q: What sparked the idea of creating Saba Family Foundation?
A: Saba Family Foundation was set up to be a catalyst for solving women’s issues like domestic violence, harassment, education and health.

Q: What is the best part of your job?
A: The best thing is that I get to meet the survivors and talk to them. Working with advocates to fund their causes and organizing campaigns to help push change.

Q: What is your idea of a perfect vacation?
A: Perfect vacation for me is one with no phone, no computer, on a beach and a lot of good food.

Q: What is your motto if life?
A: My motto is to never give up on anything that one strongly believes in.

Q: Tell us about your hobbies.
A: I love swimming and gardening. I swim for hours because it allows me to connect with myself with every stroke, and it’s a great exercise for the whole body. Gardening because it connects me with the earth. That’s when I am outside with the birds and the squirrels who always steal my tomato before I get to them.

Q: What qualities according to you one should possess to be successful in life?
A: Success is different for everyone. To me, it is being happy inside and content with the journey of life. When you are happy and positive, you can handle any hurdle, any negative thing that life hits you with through the course of life. Thus you are a successful person when you attain happiness from within.

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Making a difference

Making a difference

Malini Saba talks about balancing her roles of being a businesswoman and philanthropist, her passion for writing and love for cooking.

A self-made businesswoman and an ardent philanthropist, Malini Saba is truly a multitasker.

She started Saba Industries in the 90’s when the industry was dominated by men. “It was a man’s world when I began my career and I would never have been given the opportunity to lead a company. Thus, I put my savings together and started it. It evolved over time and now we have over 2,000 employees in eight countries. This journey has not been easy and through it all we have had failures and down turns.  But it has been a great journey,” shares Saba, who comes from a middle-class family and whose father was ailing when she was in high school. Holding herself strong, she studied Psychology and did her PhD in the field. “It was not an easy road but it made me stronger and made me understand the value of education and money.”

In 2002, she launched The Saba Family Foundation to serve as the umbrella organisation for all her philanthropic works. The foundation’s three areas of focus are healthcare, education and human rights. Saba believes that with money and power comes responsibility. “It is not there for us to abuse. I strongly feel that when God entrusts us with large amounts of money, through our hard work we must give back and make a difference to this world. I chose to do that.  I want to be able to make a difference and improve the lives and public policy for women and children. Women’s issues have always been in the forefront for me. Despite modernisation of societies, we still hold women to a different standard —their voices and cries are not heard and not taken seriously. This has to change.”

Saba has also penned The Abbreviated Cook — a book of quick and easy recipes. “Writing is a passion for me and cooking is therapeutic. I enjoy feeding my family and I believe we pass love through our food,” shares Saba, who is currently in the middle of writing another book.

After a long day of work, she comes home to her husband, child, cats and dogs.

“They are the most important part in my life. When I am not traveling, I make it a point to drop and pick up my child from school, do the grocery shopping for dinner that night and come home and make dinner with a glass of good wine. That is my normal routine. I make sure I always read to my daughter every night and talk to her about life, universe and why we are all here. This I do without fail even when I am traveling, Facetime is awesome for that. I want to give her an understanding of the world and life. I believe it’s important for parents to talk to their kids. It’s not about the amount of time you spend with them. When you do spend time with them, you have to give them 100 per cent of your time —meaning no phone, no computer, no one else talking to you. Just you and the child. That quality time is priceless.”

This article originally posted here @ THE ASIAN AGE.

Published : Oct 12, 2018, 12:23 am IST
Updated : Oct 12, 2018, 12:23 am IST

Publication:          Asian Age

Headline:              Making Difference

Language:            English

E-paper Link:       http://onlineepaper.asianage.com/asianage-epaper.aspx?id=DEL#page2

Edition:                 Delhi

Online Coverage linkhttp://www.asianage.com/life/more-features/121018/making-a-difference.html

A Supportive Man Can Help A Woman Move Mountains: Malini Saba

A Supportive Man Can Help A Woman Move Mountains: Malini Saba

A Supportive Man Can Help A Woman Move Mountains: Malini Saba

Women are the real architects of the society, said Harriet Beecher Stowe, and it is certainly true in case of Malini Saba.

A businesswoman who knows what it means to build an empire from scratch, she’s the Founder-CEO of The Saba Industries and The Saba Family Foundation. Her story is inspiring to say the least, and much more can be learned from her strong will, passion and the hard work that she puts towards what she believes in.

In a chat with SHEROES, she talks about how her life has panned out, about The Saba Family Foundation which is very close to her heart and what it takes to be a leader.

I was born in a small town in Malaysia, the eldest of 4 siblings. We did not have much growing up and hence, my goal was to always provide for my family. I studied and put myself through school and University by working three jobs, only to start my own business 26 years ago.

I now live in Vietnam and part of the time in Monaco. I have a beautiful child who is my life and soul. I’m grateful to have a spouse who is so supportive of my career and a strong man who is able to be home while I work.

His support means everything to me because it confirms to me that a supportive man can make a woman move mountains.

Helping Others Was What I Wanted To Do, Always

I knew early on in life that helping others is what I wanted to do. I strongly believe that my role in this world is to help others. In order to do that, I had to build myself up and establish a company that earned money to fund the Saba Family Foundation.

My father always helped his not-so-well-to-do family in Sri Lanka. He consistently told me that money is not to be taken for granted. It is a privilege given by God and if you ever make a lot of money, you must always give back.

Having grown up the hard way, studying and working through all sorts of odd jobs, I know what it is like to not have money, to struggle to feed yourself, pay your rent and take care of your siblings.

While this keeps me humble, it also makes me work hard to earn money and to make sure that I am able to manage the Saba Family Foundation and give back.

My nature is to make the wrong, right. I am not afraid to fight the biggest and the strongest. That has consequences but it has to be done to help those who cannot, and do not have the funds to, defend themselves.

The Saba Family Foundation & Its Vision

We are the catalyst for change. We believe that when you help one woman, you help a community, and in turn the nation. I believe in a woman’s right to stand her ground, her right to read and work.

A woman is not an ornament to be passed around, she does not belong to people.

The foundation exists to fund scholarships, legal battles for women, engage in campaigns for women issues and help young girls.

Helping With Women Centric Issues

We work with well-known partners like CARE, NETAID, VITAL VOICES and  UNICEF. We also fund the build out of schools in different countries like Mexico and Ghana, to name a few.  We helped YUVA in the early part of the Millennium to build their sight in Mumbai too.

We also hold our own campaigns like the anti-bullying campaign through schools, work environments, and older adult housing. We feel domestic violence is a form of bullying too.

Our mission stays the same – help a woman to have a voice.

Taking The Leadership Role Early On

It has been an enriching experience and the best ride of my life. I have had three failures through the course of building this company, once almost losing it all. But I stuck through it, reviewed those failures and learned about people.

I think the best lesson is if you truly believe in your business and yourself, don’t ever give up! Stick through it, no matter what someone else says to you.

You will get there and it would be beyond your wildest dreams. Success never comes easy, it comes with its own share of problems. But the growth curve is high.

You also learn about those who will stand by you because of you and your vision, and those that are there only to be riders on your coat tails. It is very important to learn how to read people. If you have those two traits, you will be fine.

Women Leaders In Industrial Arena

It is very different for women to be in this area. Most people who are in this field are men and women are in really small numbers. There are very few that have built it from scratch. Usually, it’s passed on to them from their husband or family. But I did not have that luxury – I had to build Saba Industries block by block.

Women are not much respected to know their stuff in this field. I have always wanted to keep my femininity and be strong. I feel being a woman is not a weakness in this field, it’s actually a strength.

The Challenges Of An Entrepreneur

Our foundation is funded by the business. When it comes to the foundation, to find and fund the right groups that hold true to the vision, is very important to me. I am always involved with the final selections. I treat it like a business and make sure all the due diligence is done to make sure whatever we fund is viable and will be able to have an impact or get the result it needs.

But building a business is not easy – the biggest hurdle is getting others to believe in you to help you raise funds or debt. They felt I did not understand this space. They would give me lip service – entertain my proposal but politely say, “We will pass. Come back when you have sales.”

I decided to take a loan and used my credit cards to build it out. Basically, I put in all my life savings to buy the first couple of concessions for gold and iron ore to move ahead.

The third knock from the Universe was the worst, the funds we were expecting never showed up and that put us in such a bad place – it was followed by the markets tanking and price volatility. It was a nightmare but I believed in myself and my dream and the vision. I told my closest loyal staff, we have to stick it through and once again, my savings came into play.

But when I look back, it was all worth it. Now we are in 8 countries, in different mineral and agricultural space; but I am always careful because anything can change and you have to be prepared. This business is something that should outlast me and hopefully, my child will take over it.

What Motivates Me

Life experiences are what motivates me the most. I want to change and a better work environment for women, better political environment for women and education for women. I also want us, as a society, to embrace the changes because it’s inevitable.

Nirupama Kondayya Nirupama feels that life is all about #TakingCharge, one step at a time, everyday. She truly believes that women have the potential to achieve their dreams, once they put their heart into it. She also believes that being grateful for little things has big impacts in life.

Businesswoman with a Heart

Businesswoman with a Heart

10/6/2018 – This article originally from the India Business Journal – October 2018 @ http://online.fliphtm15.com/mwdr/ohpc/#p =50

You may download the entire article here (PDFIndia Business Journal – October 2018. or
MS-WORD DOCX format here India Business Journal – October 2018

Sharmila Chand catches up with Ms. Saba (shown below) to know more about the business woman & philanthropist.
Send feedback tochand.sharmila@gmail. com.

Malini Saba is a self-made businesswoman and ardent philanthropist.

Born in Malaysia to a family of modest means, Ms. Saba spent her early life in Sri Lanka and Australia. Later, she migrated to the USA and, along with her husband, learned the nuances of business. In 2002, she launched The Saba Family Foundation to serve as an umbrella organization for all her philanthropic works. Through the foundation, she has helped millions of under-served women and children in South and South-East Asia, South America, Africa and the US gain access to life-saving medical and educational services and achieve economic stability. Funding for her philanthropic works comes from Saba Industries, a group of commodities companies that she has founded in Asia. Tak­ ing time off her  busy  schedule, Ms. Saba has penned The Abbreviated Cook, a book of quick and easy recipes that offer a twist on traditional South and South-East Asian dishes.

Q: What is your philosophy of life?
A: I believe that what goes around comes around, for I have lived long enough to see it being very true.

Q: What is your passion in life?
A: My passion and my calling in life are to help others and thus the foundation.

Q: What is your management mantra?
A: Never, never, never give up

Q: What would you like to say about your work?
A: My work is my baby. It is what I wake up to everyday. It does not define me, but it gives me great challenges, overcoming which gives me immense joy.

Q: Your strength...
A: Never giving up.

Q: A business Leader you admire the most...
A: I admire Steve jobs. He was relentless with his vision to succeed.

Q: Your weakness ...
A: Never giving up.

Q: Your kind of music...
A: I love Bollywood songs and Hip Hop.

Q: Your favourite holiday destination...
A: Bora Bora – Tahiti

Q: Golf or Bridge or...
A: Golf hands down. The game allows me to be away from my phones and alone on the grounds.

Q: You are a tough, serious boss or
A: I like to think that I am the serious kind of boss but with a soft touch much like an iron fist in a velvet glove.

Q: Formal suit or casual attire…
A: Casual attire any day

Q: What do you enjoy the most in lifegenerally?
A: I love cooking. It gives me great pleasure to come home from work and cook a variety of dishes for my family.

Q: How do you de-stress?
A: I find getting my nails done at a salon with my family very relaxing.

Q: Your mantra for success...
A: Get up, brush off, and keep at it.

Q: Your dream...
A: To make a movie in Bollywood.

Q: Ten years from now, where do we see you?
A: On my yacht, retired and writing my memoirs.

Malini Saba and 7 Networking Tips For Women

Malini Saba and 7 Networking Tips For Women

Malini Saba


Founder, Saba Family Foundations & Saba Industries

Malini Saba is a self-made businesswoman, an ardent philanthropist and a force to be reckoned with, Ms. Saba embodies the concept of using business to serve humanity Her eminent group of commodities companies, Saba Industries, is a prime example of her stratagem of using business to serve humanity. Functioning in the agriculture and mining industry, the group hires local talents and helps them achieve economic stability. The CSR arm of the group, Saba Family Foundation, has given access to life-saving medical and educational services to millions of disadvantaged people across South and Southeast Asia, Australia, Africa, India, and the Middle East. the foundation is an extension of Ms. Saba’s philanthropy and aims to help at least one billion people to gain access to basic health care, education, and opportunities which allow them to break the cycle of poverty and illiteracy.


7 Networking Tips For Women: How to Use Network to Grow Your Business Without Being Spammy

Here’s How you can also structure your own niche and find people who have similar interests
5 min read
Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.

You’re reading Entrepreneur India, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

Entrepreneurs are a rare breed. A recent study shows that less than 6% of the adults in the world work on their own business. Women account for less than half of that number. So what are the few things that women can keep in mind to increase their network?

Dress Well : They say first impression is the last impression. Dressing well and appropriate on different occasions can set different contexts in your life. You can choose between business formals and business casuals depending on your mood and commitment. Dressing well also promotes your leadership qualities. It shows that you are best prepared to deal with risks and challenges thrown at your way. Lastly, if people at social gatherings or events like your dressing sense, they are likely to connect with you and maintain a long relationship. How you present yourself matters the most.

Try Attending All Social Events : Whether it is a corporate party or a private kitty party, women need to attend all of them if they want to increase their social network. Parties are known to be spaces where people tend to get social. You will also meet a diverse range of people there and you never know who can turn out to be useful. Interactions at these parties are also very social. Many people find their prospective clients at such parties. Also, do keep an eye out for events specially meant for women entrepreneurs. The has been a sudden rise in such event and they prove to be very helpful when you need connections.

Work With Diversity : If you are really interested in growing your pool of network and expanding your business, you will need to cater to diversity and work with them. More diversity at your workplace will mean that you will be introduced to newer people, communities and culture. It will also empower you to learn about others. Diversity gives you a golden opportunity for you to develop useful contacts, gain helpful information, and obtain positive business referrals.

Use Social Media Well : Social media is the best form of communication today. It has surpassed all the forms of communication and hosts around 2.46 billion people worldwide. The most amazing feature of social media is that you can reach out to anyone without having to move anywhere. All you need is internet connection. In-person connection is slowly being overshadowed by online communication. You can find like-minded people or special kind of people you are looking for through groups and filters. Social media is also great for your business as it acts as a medium for advertisement.

Get To Know Them Beforehand : Social media can tell you a lot about people’s interests and desires. You can use this information before approaching them. A little knowledge about people’s passions, interests and desires can make you understand their demand and needs well. It can also help you tailor your services for them. It is very imperative for businesses to know their clients or any third-party vendors really well before engaging in business with them. It just ensures that your relationship is smooth and that you don’t run into any major challenges or risks

Learn From Mistakes : It is always very imperative to learn from your mistakes and not repeat them. If you have made any mistakes in the past in terms of networking, for eg. pushed too hard for something or over-talked at some event, it is suggested that you don’t repeat it. People can get turned off very easily, especially if their ideologies don’t match. In today’s age of digital and fast-paced networking, it is very easy to make mistakes that go unnoticed. Mistakes can also bring a huge blow to your business. If you hurt someone or publicly embarrass someone, chances are that people might get intimidated. Always learn to carry a respectable image in public.

Align Your Values With Others : This is the most important factor to keep in mind while networking. Aligning your values according to others means understanding needs and demands of people and supplying them service tailored for their needs. If you align your values, it is easy to attract attention and fulfill your professional cum personal goals. Aligning your values may also make you a people’s person as a lot of people will start investing time and faith on you. Most businesses are built on these two factors: time and faith. Therefore it makes more sense for women to make sure that they invest time and faith onto people they are looking to connect with. Knowing a little history about them and understanding the culture they come from can be of great help too.

These are some tips to grow your network for your business. However, you can also structure your own niche and find people who have similar interests.

Sisters, stand up and invest in yourselves at the workplace

Sisters, stand up and invest in yourselves at the workplace

Sisters, stand up and invest in yourselves at the workplace!

by Malini Saba

You are your most precious asset.

You are the most precious thing in your world.

You must invest in yourself everyday.

Never cheap out on yourself.

You are worth it!

Everything you are and everything you will be.

Is the result of how you use your mind.

– Brian Tracy

When we come across the word ‘investment’ our mind tends to think of our bank balance. For heaven’s sake, don’t limit yourself to such a small part of what investing in yourself means! To invest in yourself means to believe in you, to learn about you, to take the time to step back from routine and love yourself enough to set yourself a challenging yet attainable goal. By giving it your all, you will soon watch yourself perform better in every situation, be it at work or in your personal life. For this, it’s imperative to set aside a few minutes to invest resources into yourself as well as your well-being. I can guarantee you that through this, you will come out a more confident woman who adds value to her organisation, family, friends, and anybody else who may have the fortune of encountering you.

Our personal and professional lives are interconnected with each other more than we think. This is why it’s important to focus on investing in both areas whenever possible. Here are some of the easy ways to invest in yourself both inside and outside of the office.

Set yourself S.M.A.R.T. goals

Take the initiative to set yourself a list of personal and professional goals. If you’re not taking the time to set goals, it’s like driving a car through heavy rain with its wipers turned off. Without clearly-defined goals, you will lack clarity in vision to move forward. And we all know that when in the car, it would result in an accident.

Be sure to set time frames for achieving them. The goals set should be SMART: Significant, Momentous, Achievable, Related and Timely.

Invest in Creativity

Our creativity doesn’t have to diminish as we get older. We can carve out some time to create something new every day. Spend an hour a day to build on a business idea, improve a specific aspect of your work life or your relationships, and over time your creativity will be at its all-time peak.

We usually experience blocks in our creativity when we stagnate and lead sedentary lives- so go out, invest in traveling, try to learn more about your colleagues’ cultures, meet new people and make friends different from yourself. Before a seed can develop it must first break open. It cannot produce a plant until it’s been buried, placed out of sight, and begins to crack. In other words, people who truly want to grow, must re-evaluate their tolerance for ambiguity, for risk, and for experimentation.

Honour your intuition

“I knew what was really going on, but I didn’t say anything.”

“I wanted it so badly but I still walked away.”

Do these statements sound familiar to you?

You can show yourself some self-love by trusting your intuition, and honouring the message that it’s sending you. By paying attention to how you feel about certain things, you can make quicker decisions with healthier consequences. Learn to always trust your intuitions and that will lead to growth in life: personally and professionally.

Invest in building your confidence & knowledge

Somehow, in the professional world, our confidence either diminishes as we make mistakes or grows as we accomplish tasks and get appreciation. Often, the difference in our confidence level comes down to how we react to criticism and seek validation. Confidence equals positive emotions and a sense of secureness, which equals better performance. One needs to habitually invest time and energy into structuring a bulletproof sense of confidence in oneself and one’s abilities. You can invest in yourself at the workplace by taking your personal grooming seriously, celebrating your victories, investing time in acquiring knowledge and then making use of it.

Attend seminars and workshops, read books, listen to podcasts, and watch videos that will expand your knowledge and skills professionally as well as personally. This is what will make you stand out in the crowd

Invest in your health and nurture supportive relationships:

We can work towards achieving all our dreams, but there is no point in getting them if we don’t live enough to enjoy them or have nobody to celebrate life’s victories with.

So, eat right. Fuel your body with nutrients to boost your mind, do some basic desk exercises, and build personal as well as professional relations. The benefits earned from building our relationships is visible in every aspect of our life. The more our relationships grow, the more valuable the benefits, both personally as well as professionally.

Create your bucket list

If you have still not thought of creating a bucket list, then this is the time to create one! This list might have everything you want to do, see, feel, and experience in your life. Your list may be ongoing, but you can start by writing 10 things down. Then each month or so, make sure you’re knocking out at least one of the items off it.

Be happy for this moment, for it is your life right now

Happiness is to simply live, find gratitude and satisfaction in the moment that you have now. Make it a practice to express gratitude for everything that you have and often. Give second chances to everyone in your life including yourself. Try including ‘Thank you’s in your daily life and be genuine when you use it. Make sure to treat yourself to the little things in life. Take a quick walk around the block especially if it’s sunny outside, lend a helping hand to a co-worker, and remember the value you bring to the organisation.

Why are women not investing in themselves?

They check with someone else: When it comes to personal and professional development, women need to appoint themselves the highest authority. Your spouse, bosses, siblings or partner can have a say, but make sure to give yourself and your wants the highest priority.You need to be very clear about what you want and what you deserve, before you go out and get it.

They’re not sure when it is the “right” time. So here’s a harsh reality in life: we’re all over-the-top busy and over-committed, and it’s never going to feel like the “right time” to work on yourself. . But if you want to be successful don’t get lost in all the reasons why later would be better.

Fear that money should be used for their family or others. We don’t invest in ourselves because as a woman, we are taught to sacrifice our needs for others. For instance, to take care of our children, be a better wife by being at home, be a better daughter-in-law and so on.

But what happens if our husband gets hit by a bus on his way home from work or die on us from heart disease or maybe leave us for a younger woman? What if your husband gets into financial trouble? These are some questions that have plagued me throughout my life. We have to survive and make sure we can keep up the quality of life. Our kids have to stay in the same schools they have always gone to. Don’t bet on tragedy to strike. Invest in yourselves in ways so that you do not have to be dependent on anyone.

Whatever we do for a living, whether it is cleaning our houses, or managing companies, we must invest in our future and focus on creating a better, interesting one than the present. We should have a Plan B to fall back on, in case life brings us any surprises. Don’t let your focus on work define you as a bad woman. In fact, it is just the opposite. Think of this as an investment for you and your family because we are making sure we can always keep up the with the needs of our family, and if God forbid, life changes for the worse in a split second.

In conclusion

So, I would conclude by telling you to not give up if somebody tells you NO. Demand for non-monetary perks: flexi-time, a new title, pay revaluation the following quarter, or mentorship by or a project with a senior exec. They’re valuable in themselves, but they also get your boss into the habit of saying yes to you, and that will help you get that raise next time. Remember, this is a lifetime gap you’re working to close!

Never take no for an answer and give up on hope. If you don’t invest in yourself no one else will. When you invest in yourself, it’s the best return on investment you can give to your workplace.


Malini Saba is the founder of Saba Family Foundations and Saba Industries.

INDIA FAR FROM ACHIEVING TRUE EQUALITY

INDIA FAR FROM ACHIEVING TRUE EQUALITY

INDIA FAR FROM ACHIEVING TRUE EQUALITY

Indian women march and protest for equality.

When we celebrate women’s equality day on August 26, we must pledge to end discrimination at home and offices. Gender equality is not just about money or respect, it goes beyond that

I was in a funk because I felt like I was not a good mom.” So said ace tennis champion Serena Williams, a woman whom we associate with great accomplishments, the power of privilege, relevance as a creator of wealth and a benchmark of individual excellence. Yet when it came to motherhood, she slipped into the perennial guilt syndrome of readjusting her life around her child despite the fact that she could afford an alternative support system, an extended family and the comfort of workarounds. Still she felt that the time she gave for her child was not enough.

Working women around the world are debating the same question as Serena and given the added issues of gender pay gap, the lack of paid maternity leave and the struggle to claim reproductive rights, they have decided to step off the ramp. A survey of 1,000 qualified women in Delhi/NCR found that only 18-34 per cent of married women continued working after having a child. Some other estimates indicate that nearly half of urban working women quit their jobs mid-career for maternity leave or to bring up children. In fact, the career dropout rate of urban educated women is higher than that of their rural counterparts in cases. Even in successful and high profile double income units, once the “achieving” threshold is crossed, it is the woman who is stepping back, succumbing to the genetically conditioned mindset of a nurturer and care-giver, giving the necessary thrust to the domestic economy as it were by some extra-constitutional power and then slipping back to the normalcy of expectation. In the process, women tend to strengthen the stereotype of a man as the bread-winner and an architect of a goal-oriented career. Though a man is equally responsible for fathering a child and is emotionally capable of being the protector, he has the mantle of a career performance lumped upon him. Even when mid-retiree women develop a sense of stability with their young ones growing up, they scarcely make it back to their original trajectory but take up some part-time ventures or develop a passion-oriented home business. “Women who have family support or can afford to pay for child care have a lot of guilt. This is because of social conditioning,” says leading businesswoman Anu Aga. The biggest decline in employment has been among two groups — illiterate women and post-graduates — according to a 2017 World Bank report. Most successful male CEOs have spouses who are complementary CEOs in home management. Yet given their multi-tasking and adaptive abilities, working women could give a boost to the country’s GDP by about 30 per cent if certain policies are in place and a mindset changes. Even when they have exited corporate jobs to forge out on their own, transit professionals have helmed  boutique enterprises and start-ups with handsome turnovers.

The first of the stereotypes begins at home. Without taking away credit from metrosexual men, “fathering” is yet to develop as a concept equivalent to “mothering,” the former limited to a biological function, the latter encompassing multiple and undefined role responsibilities. Even childless women are assigned the “mothering” role in team management roles at work. It is both prized and abused at the same time. Till mothers, and most of them are educated and enlightened enough today, tell both their sons and daughters that nurturing a life is genderless and a necessary and purposeful human activity, there will be no change in the home dynamics. Till the grandfather, who revels in child care simply because he is at home after a perceived “successful” career run, asks his son to pick up the tab at home, there won’t be a change in mindset. Till fathers spend an equal time with their kids, they will no longer complain that the children naturally gravitate towards mothers. Here is a factoid: Though mothers are intimately bound to the babies physiologically for nine months, dads can bond with them even before they are born as they recognise both parents’ voices from 32 weeks. As for skin-to-skin contact, warmth has no gender and the child recognises that first. Mothers, too, admittedly in their rush for perfection in role-playing, must cede that territorial space to fathers, who will be willing if allowed to. Also, emphasis should be laid on double parenting. Neither the mother, nor the father needs to step back. And there is no need to glorify what need not be a sacrifice, be it of a stay-at-home mother or a house-husband.

Next come workplace policies, which continue to be shaped by traditional mindsets. Malini Saba, a corporate herself, has found that on an average, women today earn just 78 cents for every dollar that men earn, an increase of only 17 cents on the dollar, and that pregnancy discrimination, more than guilt pangs, has pushed women out of the queue. Pregnancy taboos are the reason that most corporate women are bypassed for a promotion or a special project simply because employers think that a maternity break reduces the woman’s ability to maintain continuity of functions or bounce back to original efficiencies. Fact is, most new mothers, given the flexibility of home operations, manage not only to deliver but make the perfect pitch at the workplace when required to stand in. Career women are multitasking themselves, juggling between family chores and deadlines, an ability that empowers them with adaptability, innovation, change, fluidity and creativity, mantras that every corporate aspires for. Few employers realise that women, as much as they cherish moments with their new-born, do not want to give up what they have invested their self-worth in — their careers. The same pregnancy/motherhood concerns have become barriers for women in physically-oriented jobs like factory floors while there is some headway in the armed forces.

Yet for all demonstrable abilities, companies become sexist and archaic when it comes to the muscularity of a given role. They would rather employ a man in his 20s and 30s over a woman of the same age for fear of maternity leave and family roles. They usually think twice about hiring a woman with a child for a senior role, assuming she cannot give her 100 per per cent. If she works reduced hours, they tend to equate it with a financial cost to the company rather than counting the efficiency she packs in her limited hours or that she can be more productive if allowed a bit of flexibility. In fact, more women opt out of jobs because of the sluggishness of their career progression and the assumption that they will be passed over. They may be considered super operators but will always be a step behind the big chair. They yield to the unhappiness at work rather than the imperatives of home duties.

Most importantly, if all offices introduced child care services or crèches where mothers could check in on their young ones, the immense relief would automatically lead to more focus at work. We must realise that this is a tiny cost to pay considering that societally care-giving or home-making is an unpaid acknowledgement.

Couple this with balanced education; for example women continue to figure extremely low, not higher than 20 per cent, in engineering and other disciplines of merit and excellence. Far too many girls are still making a “manageable and practical” choice of humanities rather than tough specialties. We don’t need role models of women fighting against the odds and conquering the unthinkable in unheard of circumstances. We need everyday examples of girls challenging prescribed choices and mainstreaming themselves instead so that they can stand shoulder to shoulder on the factory floor.

It is a myth that a woman’s biological processes or a familial orientation is an impediment to a realization of her many talents. Women never bring their family issues to work because they have always had to prove they can do as much as a man if not better. Which is why they are more committed, sorted, detailed and specific. If corporate India wants to acquire the edge, then it must help rid mothers of their guilt syndrome, consider them assets and creators rather than liabilities and pro-creators.

Bullying Of Students: Here’s What To Do About It

Bullying Of Students: Here’s What To Do About It

Bullying Of Students: Here’s What To Do About It

Have you ever wondered what to do about being bullied?
This article will explain what it is and what we can do about it.

Our article also published on BW business India.

There are two types and four styles by which students can be bullied or can bully others. The two means of bullying include direct (e.g., by a student or a group or Adult who target less powerful students as the victim and that occurs in the presence of a targeted student) and indirect (e.g., mental prohibition from students groups or spreading rumors.

Can you recall the nursery jingle “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me”? Observably that was not and is not the reality and can never be especially in the case of Bullying that takes place at schools. Bullying is a behavior that is purposeful and contains an imbalance of power or strength. It is a behavior that is physical, verbal, or relational. While boys may bully others by more physical means; girls often bully by social rejection. Bullying has been a part of the workplace and School for a long period. More recently through technology & social media bullying has extended its reach. Cyberbullying is the example which takes place online and via cell phones.

There are two types and four styles by which students can be bullied or can bully others. The two means of bullying include direct (e.g., by a student or a group or Adult who target less powerful students as the victim and that occurs in the presence of a targeted student) and indirect (e.g., mental prohibition from students groups or spreading rumors. In addition to these two modes, the four types of bullying include broad categories of physical, verbal, relational (e.g., efforts to harm the reputation or relationships of the targeted youth), and damage to property.

Occurrence

More than one out of every five (20.8%) students report being bullied according to a report from National Centre for Educational Statistics.

Most bullying happens in middle school. The most common kinds are verbal and social bullying.

83% of students who bully others online also bully others in person.

84% of students who were bullied online were also bullied in person.

Who are at Risk? 

Usually, children who are bullied have one or more of the following risk factors:

Professed as different from their peers, such as being underweight or overweight, having short height, wearing glasses or different clothing, new to a school, or being not able to have materials that kids consider as ‘Cool”.

Seen as weak or unable to protect themselves.

Depressed, concerned, Uneasy or with low self-esteem.

Failing an exam/class or securing fewer marks.

Less popular than others or like to live with the small group of friends.

Do not get along well with others or are generally punished by teachers.

Though, if a child has all these risk factors, it doesn’t mean that they will be bullied.

Where Bullying Occurs?

Bullying can happen at any number of places, situations, or locations. At times that place can be online or through a cell phone. Bullying that occurs using technology (including but not limited to cell phones, chat rooms, instant messaging, email, and social media posts) is considered electronic bullying and is viewed as a context or location.

Mostly Bullying takes place in the playgrounds, school buses, cafeteria, in restrooms, hallways, and locker rooms.

Disconnect Between Adults 

It is found that most often there is a disconnect between students and an adult understanding for a case of bullying. Adults often don’t know how to react when they do identify a case of bullying. Considerably only about 20 to 30% of students who are bullied inform adults about it.

Promising Prevention Strategies

Staff and students should try and notice when a child is bullied or left out during the games, Lunchtimes etc. This involves the efforts of everyone in the school environment—teachers, Principal, administrators, counselors, non-teaching staff (such as bus drivers, nurses, school resource officers, cafeteria workers, and school librarians), parents, seniors, and students. They should be trained in bullying anticipation and involvement and how to respond if they observe bullying & its prevention.

Also, a group can be formed to coordinate the school’s bullying prevention activities. The work of that group can be to motivate staff, students, and parents; prevent rules, policies, and activities; and ensure that the efforts continue over time. A student advisory group can be formed to focus on bullying prevention and provide valuable suggestions/ feedback to adults.

Bullying and Suicide

The relationship between Bullying and suicide is somehow coinciding in many cases in schools and colleges. Much psychological research says that bullying leads to isolation, depression, low self-esteem and in return suicidal behaviors is found in individuals. The major variety of people who are bullied do not become suicidal. Some youth, such as LGBTQ youth, are at increased risk for suicide tries even where bullying is not a factor.

Anti-bullying Laws

It is vital to be aware of the laws made to control bullying in India so that the problem is nipped in the bud.

 Laws in Schools

Former HRD minister formed a committee of experts to analyze Bullying in school and to prevent it. Following is the CBSE School Bullying Protection Law guide:-

If any student is found Bullying or ragging it will be given a written notice and can even result in rustication for that particular ward.

Putting a notice on Notice Board that if any students are found bullying will be liable for strict action

A Committee member to prevent bullying it shall include the vice principal, a senior teacher, doctor, counselor, parent-teacher representative, school management representative, and legal representative and peer educators.

Laws in Colleges

The government of India in order to stop/prevent bullying has created a guideline called “UGC Regulations on Curbing the Menace of Ragging in Higher Education Institutions, 2009” which is applied to all the colleges or higher education institutions and are as follows:

FIR: The victim can avail thirteen provisions under Indian Penal Code and can register an FIR (first information report) in the police station under the area where the crime has taken place. The person can apply various Indian sections of Laws, such as:
Section 294– Obscene acts and songs
Section 339– Wrongful restraint
Section 340– Wrongful confinement
Section 341– Punishment for wrongful restraint
Section 342– Punishment for wrongful confinement
Section 506– Punishment for criminal intimidation

 Extreme Violence

When there is a case of extreme bullying or ragging that includes extreme violence:
Section 323– Punishment for voluntarily causing hurt
Section 324– Voluntarily causing hurt by dangerous weapons or means
Section 325– Punishment for voluntarily causing grievous hurt
Section 326– Voluntarily causing grievous hurt by dangerous weapons or means

 In a case where a victim has lost his/her life

Section 304– Punishment for culpable homicide not amounting to murder
Section 306– Abetment of suicide
Section 307– Attempt to murder
Though, these UGC anti-ragging measures and the laws of IPC are not applied to schools.

 Cyber-bullying Laws

If the student is been a victim of cyberbullying it can file a complaint under the Indian Penal Code. Under the I.T. Act, 2000 the victim can apply for two kinds of offenses Section 67 of punishment of information which is obscene and breaches of confidentiality.

8 Characteristics of a Strong woman, Malini Saba

8 Characteristics of a Strong woman, Malini Saba

8 Characteristics of a Strong woman, Malini Saba

What do the following household names have in common — Amelia Earhart, Rosa Parks, and Malala Yousafzai? Describing these women as powerful, strong, brave, and revolutionary is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to recognizing their achievements. But what exactly made them that way?

Amelia Earhart was the first female pilot to perform a solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean. That was a big deal at the time. When you think about it, it still is.

Rosa Parks refused to give in to the racist culture of the early-mid 1900s by refusing to move to the back of the bus. We all know the impact that action had on history.

Malini Saba was awarded the Federation Peace Prize for her role of becoming the first Sri Lankan woman to achieve great business success despite the war against Tamils for thirty years.  She is the youngest person to ever receive the Peace Prize.

These strong, charismatic, powerful women are all icons of human achievement, and a testament to their gender. But how exactly do these women tap into such greatness? What is their secret?

Truth is, there’s no prerequisite of fame or grand gestures to be a powerful woman. Power is an internal characteristic, not an award from society. That’s when women display noble characteristics of strength, leadership, integrity, and honor, we should revel in their achievements, and respect their legacies.

Here are just some characteristics (out of many) that powerful and strong women typically display:

1. They are comfortable with themselves and their pasts.

Running away is not something that powerful women do. Unfortunately, trauma is highly prevalent for women. Powerful women do not let their past overtake them. Healing from the past is a long road, and a strong woman knows this. She does not expect to heal overnight, yet she keeps trying to close her wounds and move forward. A strong woman will do what she can to help others without endangering their own safety. They use their experiences to teach others new truths or raise awareness for certain causes. They are smart, however, they know not to trust just anyone with the details of their traumas.

2. They don’t let rejection ruin their spirit or their lives.

Fear of rejection is a natural part of life. Rejection is a painful experience for whoever suffers through it. Being rejected is a common human experience, although some people handle the pain much better than others. A strong woman knows that she needs to take the time to grieve, and incorporate loss into their framework for strength and success. A powerful woman refuses to let such things overwhelm her life. She still chases her goals, finds new opportunities, and learns from her experiences. When one door closes, another door opens, and strong, smart, capable women know that better than most.

3. They are honest but not overly trusting.

Lies and dishonesty are a part of life, and a strong woman has had her fair share of betrayals to know one or two things about trust. She knows that in her orchard, there will always be some bad apples. This doesn’t deter her and she will stay true to herself. She is honest about who she is but doesn’t
wear her secrets on her sleeve. This characteristic saves her wasted time, money, and heartbreak. Drama may consume her friends but she stays far away, and takes time to develop trust for others.

4. They possess incredible amounts of creativity.

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. A powerful woman is aware of this and when one way is not working, she is ready to move onto the next. Even when there is no other path clearly marked, she is ready to forge ahead. She has a bright streak of creativity that allows her to constantly brainstorm new and innovative ideas. Her imagination is nearly limitless and fuels her ambition, making her a beacon of hope and intuition for others who encounter her attitude.

5. They make fantastic role models.

Everyone has had a role model at one point or another that ended up changing their lives. Becoming a role model is something that powerful women appreciate and enjoy. These women help others unlock their potential and creativity through their guidance. Powerful women reflect upon their own role models and previous mentors to help guide them and channel that energy into their own great leadership skills.

6. They easily admit it when they are wrong.

Admitting to wrongdoing can be embarrassing and stressful for anyone. Strong women are not immune to these emotions, but they are able to cope with them and ask for help when it’s needed. They’re not arrogant. When a strong woman needs help, she’s always comfortable enough to ask graciously and appreciate the assistance. Because women (and men) know that valuable help is a true opportunity.

7. They never try to bring down their peers (or other women).

Some people feel the need to drag others down instead of building them back up. This is not something that powerful women do. Instead of finding joy in beating others down, they find joy in bringing them up. She knows that her value is not dependent on anyone else and only dependent on herself. Strong women do not feed into the stereotype that women hate each other. Instead, when they notice their friends and peers struggling, they do their best to help. They fill in the gaps of other people instead of making them worse. They try to be a support and a shoulder others can lean on when they are in need.

8. They take great care of themselves, and of others.

Powerful women keep their minds, bodies, and emotions strong through self-care. Self-care is truly engaging in anything that will keep you healthy. Strong women know that they need to stay hydrated, eat well, and exercise. They also know that self-care does not stop with the physical body, as the mind needs to be cared for as well. They can control their emotions and know how to cope with mental health problems. It is important to note that having a mental illness does not make someone weak.

Understanding these eight reasons, it is clear that Malini Saba deserves to be seen among other strong women as she has achieved success despite the odds against her. She has suffered loss and was strong enough to step back in with both feet and persevere. In Malini Saba own words” We can sit and cry for what others have tried to do to bring us down, or we can get right back up and rise like the phoenix from the ashes.”

In her words “Throw me to the wolves and I WILL return the leader of the pack. “

Malini Saba Legacy

Malini Saba Legacy

Malini Saba Legacy

By Chandra Lingam

Malini unknowingly will leave a legacy with her Charitable work globally. She started it because it is a passion. A passion to help others in need and create a world where everyone has same opportunities. Saba believes that through different decades, different political environments , we as a people should always stay focused on our goals to help others. Never to be swayed by the changes around on the 30,000 feet level.

In Malini’s words “Politics change every four years , but the ground level problems always stay the same. To create a real impact its up to us civilians with passion to move mountains and bring  the mountain to Muhammed as the saying goes”  she explained with a smile.  Malini went on to explain “ If that is all we focus on we can as a world of common people make real change”.

I went on to ask her five things she would say about how to leave a legacy.
Saba responded with 5 ways.

  1. Support the People and Causes That are Important to You
    My best friend of decades ago once asked me what I thought was the most important attribute of friendship. I replied that support was the major theme of friendship. There isn’t any more wonderful feeling in life than making the choice to sustain loyalty to a friend by lovingly supporting everything that is good and right about that person’s life. My friend was an advocate of Older adult  in the city we resided in and I supported those causes, too, as she supported mine. Although we parted ways when I moved out of the city, she would always reach out to me and remember my work, my life and my family.
  2. Reflect and Decide What is Most Important in Your Life
    When you review your life’s journey, several ideas may come to mind: Did you grow and perhaps transform your life, make changes when you needed to, find your truth, inspire others, become a leader or influence others? Touching lives and exemplifying a truthful path is paramount to living a joyful and purposeful life. Your legacy will live on.
  3. Share Your Blessings With Others
    I was walking two dogs the other day — one dog was totally blind and the other dog stubbornly knew her mind. I stopped suddenly in the middle of my son’s beautiful neighborhood to observe with wonder the late afternoon thunderclouds bulging out from the mountains. I thought of all the blessings I have in life and how I try to be mindful of sharing with others the richness of my life. I have been given abundance and such is my fate. And it is my legacy to give back this abundance to others. Everyone has blessings to share, even if it a simple smile of acknowledgement.
  4. Be a Mentor to Others
    A mentor by definition is a more experienced or more knowledgeable person with an area of expertise. Everyone has some significant truth to impart to others that will guide less experienced people in life. The mentoring/mentee relationship involves personal development and support. This process involves an exchange of knowledge complimented by psychological and/or social support that is crucial to sustaining new mindsets. Sometimes these relationships last a lifetime, even when the mentee has moved on to influence others.
  5. Pursue Your Passions Because They Are Infectious
    Your passions are your legacy. Passion comes from an outpouring of the interests and ideas that make a difference in your life. Finding and pursing your passion allows you to see your destiny clearly. That’s what happened to me with meditating and music. I can attest to the fact that life won’t be any fun if you don’t pursue your passions to the fullest. It’s contagious. It’s religious. Don’t miss the opportunity to pursue your passions and then continue to look for new adventures.

Malini Saba is a visionary and someone who sees things through a difference lens than most of us. She is willing to push the envelope when needed and never afraid to ask for what she needs for the betterment of others.

I followed her to one of the hospitals she supports in India. We walked in like just another person. She never made any appointments. She was treated like another person until one of the board members recognized her and immediately the service altered.  I asked her why she did not call them ahead of time, her response, “I want to see how they serve their patients. Money should never buy better service when it comes to healthcare. Everyone health problem is the same and has the same intensity to their families. I do this to see if they practice what they preach.”

Having interviewed many wealthy Asians, I found Malini Saba just the opposite. She was so very humble and had no airs about her and you would never realize how really wealthy she really is because of the manner she conducts herself.

Malini Saba – Success Story

Malini Saba – Success Story

A True Success Story

Saba Industries Incorporated, is known for its strong holdings in Mining and Agriculture. The company produces iron ore, Gold, Bauxite, Palm oil and Rice. Malini dove into the commodity space believing that we all need raw material. Although Saba Industries has grown exponentially, it still remains a family-owned business.

Saba graduated from high school and later graduated with a degree in Psychology. After many failed relationships, she married and had children. Saba is an ardent entrepreneur and started her business in the 1990’s and still stands at the helm as the CEO of the company.

Saba’s net worth, as estimated to be over $1.5 billion dollars (USD). Among her several philanthropic contributions are donations to Australian Outback doctors, San Francisco Arts Academy, India’s Artists, and Children’s Hospital in Cambodia. Saba also owns farms that specialize in organic farming.

She has been awarded the Entrepreneur of the Year, Philanthropist of the year, Kalpana Chawla award, the Mother Theresa Award and the Federation Peace award for her global Philanthropic work.

She contributes to different causes through her philanthropic initiative Saba Family Foundation.

Hard work, discipline and a keen sense of business is what makes her one of the most successful contemporary business woman.

The Iceberg Ilusion

Understanding Employees – Important for Success

Understanding Employees – Important for Success

Why understanding your employees is important for Success.

By Rajeshwari Sajosh

I wanted to interview Saba to understand her views on Management and what she thought about hiring more women in her field.

Her feedback was enlightening. She has some strong views on management and gender equality in the workplace.

She had four areas which she focused on beginning with :

Unite, Don’t Direct

There’s a fine line between a leader and a manager. For one, a leader inspires employees to follow her lead and pursue her goals. A manager, on the other hand, leads by instruction and directives. This is why Malini Saba finds one more successful than the other:
In my experience, encouraging a team-oriented culture that is focused on uniting employees behind a shared sense of purpose and a common goal is more effective than offering directives. If you and your leadership team are on the same page with this approach, it is much easier to engage employees throughout the firm to meet those collective goals.  

Tailor the Experience

The first step in achieving gender equality in the workplace is understanding and supporting the fact that men and women work differently. Most importantly, Saba encourages women to find opportunity in everything:

As employers, we need to accept that women and men operate differently in the workplace and set up development and training programs that are designed to target high potential employees in both groups. As women, we need to remind ourselves to have an ‘opt in’ attitude. Career downturns happen to everyone and we must remember to treat them as opportunities to change how we work or try something new. That is what shows our true mettle.

Invest in professional development

When it comes to increasing female executive leadership, Malini  reminds employers to create equal and ample opportunities for women to climb the corporate ladder:
Companies must invest in their female employees’ leadership and professional development. I’m very proud of the numerous development and mentoring programs that Saba Industries has in place to help women excel at our firm and we’re seeing results that are validating this approach.

Ending gender pay inequality 

Unfortunately, gender Pay inequality still very much exists. But, as Saba suggests, there are ways to combat this inequality both inside and outside of the workplace:
The issue is complex because there is still no single answer as to why. Saba Industries’s interest in this issue goes far beyond our organization; we want to empower women’s financial futures, and that means putting programs, such as our seminars, in place to help them understand their finances.

Being the President and CEO of a multinational corporation is no easy feat. But Malini Saba shows us that through hard work, the right attitude and a great team, it is possible.